articles tagged "immigration"

Drop the “I” Word

Wednesday, 8 May 2013 | A Public Affair
RinkuSencolor (1)

On Wednesday, May 8th host Karma Chavez interviewed Rinku Sen, the Executive Director of the Applied Research Center and publisher of Colorlines.com.The discussed the increasingly successful campaign by Colorlines to persuade media outlets to change the language they use about immigration – and drop the “I” word, illegal, as a term to refer to anyone who is not a US citizen or permanent resident. more »

The Battle To Stay In America

Thursday, 28 February 2013 | buzz
nunst004

Joining the 8 O’Clock Buzz from Tucson, Arizona on Thursday, February 28, 2013, was Roberto Dr. Cintli Rodriguez. He talks about Arizona’s ongoing immigration issues. Rodriguez contributes to his blog, the Progressive and the Guardian.     more »

Illegal People

Wednesday, 2 January 2013 | A Public Affair
Mixtec Migrant Farm Workers in Taft

On Wednesday January 2nd, host Karma Chavez spoke with author, journalist, and photographer David Bacon about his work regrading NAFTA and immigration. For the last twenty years David Bacon, through his work as a writer and photojournalist, has researched the relationship between the global economy, labor, and migration. In his book “Illegal People” published in 2009, he exposes the failures of our national policy produces which lead to increasing displacement, migration, immigration raids, and an increasingly divided and polarized society. pushing for an overhaul in how we think, debate, and legislate about and around immigration, Bacon promotes focus on human rights in this age of globalization. He is also author of the book “The Children of NAFTA” which discusses labor wars on the U.S./Mexico Border.   Read more about David Bacon: http://dbacon.igc.org/   Read more about the book “Illegal People:” http://www.amazon.com/Illegal-People-Globalization-Criminalizes-Immigrants/dp/0807042307   Read more about the book “The Children of NAFTA:” http://www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520244726   Listen to the entire interview: more »

Sebastian Rotella: Migrants from South of the Mexican Border

Wednesday, 12 December 2012 | buzz
ProPublica

On Wednesday December 12, host Jan Miyasaki spoke with Sebastian Rotella, an award winning foreign correspondent and a senior investigative reporter at ProPublica, Sebastian Rotella. Prior to working at ProPublica, Sebastian worked for the L.A.Times for twenty three years. He has most recently been focusing on changes in immigration patterns, especially migrants coming in to the United States from south of the Mexican border, a group that is often not focused on.   Says Sebastian, “Overall illegal immigration has gone down a lot, even though sometimes the political debates make it seem like it’s out of control. And the proportions have changed – what my story shows is that although Mexicans are still the biggest group that crosses, the proportions have changed dramatically.”   Sebastian explains that the number of Central Americans crossing into the U.S. has substantially risen, especially those from Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador, countries especially faced with violence and poverty. The demographic of this group is largely young adults who are traveling alone. While there are relatively fewer obstacles to face when crossing into the Southern Mexican border, the migrants face numerous problems at the Mexican-American border, where they are highly vulnerable to extortion, robbery, rape and murder by gangsters, smugglers, and corrupt officials.   The Mexican drug cartels also play a heavy role in the thriving smuggling business.Sebastian explains that many of the youth are escaping the environment of violence from their hometowns, but only encounter more violence at the hands of those networked around the smugglers. He describes a situation of “systematic recruitment” by the drug cartels at the border.   Sebastian had interviewed two individuals from Ecuador, Marco and his wife, who paid $11,000 per person to come to New York, “They move through a very loose but highly organized network – they were given a phone number and a codeword… They started in Ecuador, and went to Honduras where they stayed at a safe house, to Guatemala, and then to Mexico.” At Mexico, they had been placed on a train alone where they got caught by Mexican officials. Sebastian explains that although they were disappointed, the couple was also relieved that they did not have to go through the most dangerous part of the smuggling process that was still to come at the Mexican-American border.   The detention centers, Sebastian describes, were packed fully with migrants from across Central America and Mexico who were caught. After the migrants are discharged from …. more »

Dying to Cross: A Visual Tribute

Thursday, 8 November 2012 | buzz
By wonderlane on Flickr

A visual tribute project commemorating the lives of men and women who died crossing the US border from Mexico is discussed on the Thursday November 8 edition of the 8 O’Clock Buzz. Host Tony Castaneda interviews Ariana, a student at Edgewood College, who created the project. Her project, “Dying to Cross,” is a visual tribute commemorating the 177 men and women who died in the deserts while crossing the southern border, in pursuit of their American Dream. The project is displayed in the library courtyard of the Edgewood campus. Says Ariana, “I’ve come from a family of immigrants, so I’ve seen both sides of it; how it affects people here in the US and how it affects people in Mexico. So I just wanted the people of Edgewood to be able to think about it a little.” The project features 177 crosses across the campus and the library courtyard. Each cross contains the name, gender, age, and cause of death of the individual: most of the causes of death say “unknown.” Ariana explains that it is typically volunteers who discover the bodies in the desert.   The project is open to the public. A remembrance ceremony will be held today, November 8, at 6:30 PM in front of the main building on campus.   There will also be a film showing at 7 PM with a discussion to follow afterwards. “De Nadie” is presented in conjunction with the Immigration film series that is currently being held on campus at the Anderson auditorium.   Contact Edgewood’s Center for Diversity and Inclusion for more information.   Listen to the entire interview here: more »

Page 2 of 212

rev. 52M